No Way Out – Syrian Crisis Analysis


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Feeling especially emotional on the issue at the moment.

Will we allow to grip the West? To treat the way Jews were treated by Nazi Germany? Internment camps? Tough screening?

Anti-Arab sentiment a tradition of the West. Hollywood typecasting of ; orientalist oversimplification of otherwise rich Arab culture.

This should also be classified as anti-semitism, since the word includes all Semitic linguistic groups: Arab, Hebrew, Aramaic, etc.

As if the West didn’t help to create this problem.

The solution is America butting out.

has carried on ‘s torch of . By butting out of the Middle East, reform and stability could be possible.

Neither reform nor stability will envelope the Middle East because that is against US interests.

Democracy or reform, will not be brought by the Americans to the Arab world and it never has been.

As soon as butts out, the can enjoy its and an environment conducive to ; what form it may take.

Note America’s overthrow of democratically elected leaders in and . Stop the ignorance and propaganda.

Daesh should thus be called Wahhabi State of Saudi Arabia, given SA has support of Levant & Iraq combined.

The mere existence of the entity of the “Kingdom of Saudi Arabia” like the “State of Israel” is an imprint of a colonial past.

The guilt of the US is in knowing its negligence and greed essentially enabled Wahhabism. Mainly the policies of the .

Hollywood liberalism and mega church conservatism have suppressed the moderate center in US politics.

Arabs are constantly viewed through the spectrum of culture & tribal lifestyle. This is orientalist, & prejudiced in nature.

If America was actually secular, it would have sided with Palestine long ago. But Christian ultranationalism has pushed it closer to Israel.

Secularism promotes religious tolerance & diversity whereas US ultraconservatives & Israeli politicians promote ethnocentrism and theocracy.

The sensitivities of religion have been exploited for the sake of resources and preservation of global imbalance via democratic-crusaderdom.

All in all, the more power the indigenous populations of Syria and elsewhere in the world are able to wield using the natural resources, geopolitical positioning, and collective unity as leverage, the better chance the country has at mitigating foreign exploitation. This would in turn provide greater political stability to Syria, and could essentially induce a more stable future. It could possibly usher more accountability in governance that could more appropriately address all aspects of Syrian livelihood; whatever “form” that mechanism for accountability may take. And it won’t be on the time watch or the standards of the West, or the East, which means its overall composition may be unique in form, democratic or not. 

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Remembering Anthony Shadid (1968-2012)


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On September 1st, 2011, late journalist & NYT foreign correspondent Anthony Shadid came to speak to UCF students about his recent escapades in the Middle East, namely his most recent experiences in Libya, where Shadid recalled being taken hostage with two other associates for three days.

I am grateful to say I had the opportunity to sit in on his speech. I was even able to meet with Shadid shortly after his speech during which I introduced myself. He was quick to smile with news that I am Syrian. I purchased his most recent book, Night Draws Near, in which he left me a little note, perhaps a little naive in hindsight, or just rashly hopeful as all Arabs tend to be. “See you in Damascus,” he uttered.

Anthony Shadid reminded me what it means to be an Arab, aside from the ordinary customs, our cuisine, language music and traditions. Anthony Shadid reminded me that at the heart of being Arab is the nature of resilience; our ability to laugh and chuckle even amidst the darkest of chaos. I vaguely remember a story told to me by close friend of mine, a Palestinian political activist from Ramallah, Tami Rafidi. Rafidi, whose husband was taken captive by Israeli forces never to be returned, embodied this resilience. Despite her frustrations; anger & suffering, Rafidi recalled memories of running wildly along the rugged Palestinian terrain dodging Israel fire while laughing, telling jokes & drinking the famous Arab liquor – ‘arak’.

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In 2006, when Israel began bombing Hezbollah sites in Lebanon, the Lebanese people were seeking refuge by day; clubbing relentlessly by night. Despite all the misery and control, the Arabs found a way; an outlet.

It is Tami’s resilience, the resilience of the Lebanese people, which echoed the sentiments of Anthony Shadid, who did not stop short of asserting during his speech: “At the heart of the Arab struggle is Palestine, a very dear subject for the Arab & Muslim world. This cannot be understated.”

I admire this man for his courage and resolve.

In 2012, during a trip to Syria where he was capturing stories about the ensuing conflict in the region, Shadid suffered what appeared to be a asthma attack. Shortly after Shadid passed. I was shocked by the news. Without any history of medical complications except for minor sensitivities to allergens, Shadid was not on course for any type of health issues.

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I remember having met his daughter at the time of his speech. She was quite young, very polite & beautiful. My prayers and thanks are with her, wherever she may be, for having had such an amazing man as a father. My dream is to honor his legacy and the struggle of the Arab people all over the world, which he represented so well.

I did not want to go into any details or elaborate on the possibility of foul-play regarding Shadid’s death, out of respect for him & his family. I will add, however that with regards to the Middle East, there is without a doubt an unrelenting fear among journalists, dissidents or activists of any sort, of persecution for propagating legitimate news, especially if it poses a threat to the interests of particular political actors. His bodies of work, including the aforementioned book, shows no restraint in exposing the consequences of the US government’s disastrous policies which would usher in violent instability & chaos that has yet to conclude, even a decade after the US initiated the invasion.

I pray that in the case of Shadid, his passing was a matter of fate and nature. Nonetheless, his legacy remains & the struggle for Arab dignity continues.

RIP Anthony Shadid. Thank you. May the children of Iraq see justice one day. Long live the Arab struggle for freedom & may Palestine one day be free!

From Marlon Brandon and the Native Americans to Maduro and the fate of Venezuela


From Marlon Brandon and the Native Americans to Maduro and the fate of Venezuela

What an evening. I’ve read some of the most interesting stuff today. From this features BI article about Marlon Brando and his gesture to not attend the Oscars in 1973 for his lead role in ‘The Godfather’, to coverage of Maduro’s Venezuela, I cannot say this has been a boring not for journalism. What do the two have in common? Well, I could’ve posted many other things. In fact, I might have preferred to replace the Maduro section with an article about Bashar al-Assad, president of my country, Syria, which has been in turmoil for about three years now. Syria, like Venezuela, Ukraine, Egypt, and many more, are the modern playing fields of the world’s greatest powers. These are the outlets of the cold war; where the axes meet – East, and West. In many parts of the world, the struggle is imminent. But what struggle? From the Zapatistas of Mexico, to the Palestinian Resistance, what is this universal struggle facing mankind in different areas of his earthly soil? Who are the players in this ‘game’? The Native Americans lost half the earth to Christian Imperialism. Today, Zionism threatens the existence of the Palestinian nation — or what is left of it. Don’t look so far – the effects are spilling over into neighboring regions of the Middle East, from Lebanon to Egypt. The war between good and evil is still going on dear friends. Which side are you on? 


So much potential and self-trust, self-faith, and determination that I’d hate to waste it on pointless positions in life like wage-based salaries and orthodox conformities. Get the fuck out of here. All these weirdos who try to convince me they are happy. Why you want to force me into your ways then, if you are so happy? Look I am going to be king. I need to be cause if I am not I won’t be here. I am great. I want to be.