Dani al-Armani


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This image really captures my identity.

I do think it visually symbolizes who I am – half Armenian half Arab – Syrian.

My heritage includes Palestinian, Italian too. Perhaps there is more European blood from my father’s side – but nonetheless, that side of my family is vehemently Armenian. About as homogeneously Armenian as the ethnic group itself.

Culturally we are influenced by Christianity, Philosophy, Secularism, Gnosticism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism and Islam.

One day I hope to visit Yerevan, my original home. Perhaps then I can built a modest home with my family, and create hip-hop, musical masterpieces eternally from there!

God bless Armenia and my people. I only pray we can one day meet again. I also pray you may understand my struggles, and how being half Muslim, ostracized me even further from my Armenian roots. But the truth is that the genocide produced this reality.

Still deep in my heart I know Armenians have no qualm with Islam.

There are extremes everywhere, but for the vast majority, there is harmony. Remember, in its conflict against Azerbaijan, a Shia muslim country, Iran, the world’s biggest Shia muslim country, stands with Armenia, a Christian nation, out of principle.

Furthermore, Armenians have no qualms with Islam or Turks – rather they wish for historical atrocities and political justices to be recognized and initiated. Was this not healthier for Germany in the long run?

I do love my Syrian-Arab heritage too, equally. That is precisely why this picture evokes my emotions so well. I believe in tenants of Islam too; as well as the narrative. I do believe in many cases though, like all religions, it has been distorted.

Perhaps one day we shall all meet and I may share my unique, perhaps twisted, conception of religion which has become my faith, thanks to my Syrian mother, and Syrian-Armenian father. I dedicate this to them, my grandfather Yervant, the bright and shining genius of our family whom I look up to and aspire to be like. I also dedicate this to the fallen souls of the Armenian Genocide who shall never be forgotten, ever. Finally, I dedicate this to my other home, Syria, which is in utter catastrophe and destruction. God be with you all.

With love,

the son of KRIKOR & al Ghaib,

Dani al-Armani.

In America, they call me Danny K!

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Tomorrow at 2PM


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My complete self-produced album drops tomorrow 3.14.16 at 2 PM. It has been quite a journey putting this project together. An expression of my experiences, my life, struggles as well as the influences of society, all in one. This piece will speak for itself. It will be available via SoundCloud.Till tomorrow!
Credits:
Krikos (executive producer)
TrayZarc Art (film)
Ajara Boulibekova (model)
Yubi via Henao Contemporary Center  (cover artwork)
Stephen Randall (audio engineer)
Real Feel Recording (recording)
Colours of the Culture (host)

Meanwhile watch the video for “W.Y.W.”, the single off the album below:

Danny Krikorian aka KRIKOS was born in Riyadh Saudi Arabia. He moved to the US at age 6 and became quickly absorbed in the culture of hiphop. Over the years, Danny has put out various pieces, producing for other artists like Brooklyn legend Talib Kweli. This album is entirely self-produced and features KRIKOS himself, narrating his own story through the culture of hiphop by which he has been molded. The project, “Checks & Balances”, is a dichotomy balancing the roots and the future of hiphop, the politics of justice and power, and the need for maintaining authenticity while pursuing financial freedom. It is furthermore an expression of all the struggles endured by Danny as an immigrant from the Middle East. “Checks & Balances” tells the story of a journey, and leaves hope for a future of justice and prosperity for all. With influences drawn from the golden era of hiphop, Danny uses both the staple foundations of hiphop such as soul sampling as well as fusing it with the new 808 sound that has emerged over the last decade. The piece seeks to bridge the gap between the trendy and the socially responsible.