A Humble Conversation With A Palestinian Doctor


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I had a very interesting discussion today with a gentleman of high esteem. For the sake of privacy I won’t mention names, but the individual is a professional doctor and US citizen of Palestinian descent.

Our conversation surrounded my career trajectory as a student of Political Science and immigrant from the Middle East.

Perhaps if I were a US citizen, I would have considered running for office in America, but due to my limitations, I have chosen the routes of international diplomacy and academia.

My hopes are that I can further the interests of the US on an international scale as well as those of the Arab World, thereby improving relations between the two regions.

The doctor with whom I spoke, allowed me to explain the contents of my thesis, which is a constructivist analysis of the causes of instability in the Middle East, emphasizing the variable of foreign interventionism as the most significant in influencing stability in the Middle East, as well as on a global scale. This thesis, as I explained, is a hybrid research including qualitative and quantitative research, which will include theoretical arguments, implications, setbacks/weaknesses, anecdotal/historical evidence as well a quantitative segment. The latter section includes a linear regression comparing trends of democratization, treated as foreign intervention via neoconservatism, and terrorism, treated as the primary expression of instability in the region today. Finally, this will be followed a conclusion.

After explaining this, I also expressed to the doctor that my main objective is to reconcile the interests and relationship between the US and the Arab World. I wish to convince the US that it is in both her interests and within her moral ideal to stand with the Arab World in its struggle against arbitrary violations of sovereignty. The doctor proceeded to advise me – we must bring our nations close to one another. His emphasis was on the fact that the US is my home as much as the Arab World, and that by bringing the two closer together, we are not only improving the conditions of our original home, but also, of our new home – our nation, America.

I am more than honored to have such experiences. It is very rare that I can discuss such an emotional topic with someone who has had direct experience in it. To speak of Palestine is one thing – to be from it is another – to have lived through it, especially. That being said, my dream is to further the search for peace and justice in that part of the world, and I believe, I have been brought here to the states for a reason, to humanize what has been reduced to a conflict of savages, into a more accurate picture depicting a humble struggle for humanity.

To a free Palestine!

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Searching for the inner me. Almost there. Praying,


Searching for the inner me. Almost there. Praying, at least, that I am almost there. I can smell it, in the air. Really.


I thought I had a purpose. I believe in myself. But sometimes I wonder. I question where I am going. I know this music thing is me. I know I will be something great. But if I know it why do I doubt it? Is it just a matter of time? I hope so. As for all my worries, they shouldn’t be there. I am worried about what? Can’t I and won’t I get everything I want? They’ll try to take it from me. I can’t let them.

The Struggle


It is without a doubt that life is a struggle. I watched this Bob Marley documentary once and while I didn’t finish it entirely, a quote from the film stuck with me. I am not sure who the man was who was speaking, could have been one of Marley’s relatives or closer friends. He was explaining Marley’s upbringing and the trials he faced as he grew into a man.

“It’s the type of struggle that’ll make a kid go good or bad.”

It was months later when the quote resurfaced in my mind and hit me. It was one of those days when I found myself down and depressed, allowing the ego in my mind to rip away at my soul, to convince me of all the things I don’t believe in and don’t want to believe in.

This life is a struggle. It is a struggle to reach closure, to find happiness and peace, and to do so yourself. I believe in God, and although I am not exactly sure of the nature of our connection, I do know that in this life we are protected — those of us who are ambitious enough to seek the truth, to fight against evil, and to stand for justice.

The struggle is the test, the test to see whether we are more concerned with anger, frustration and bitterness or with success, joy and ambition.

I am struggling, but my eye is on the latter.

heart pours/then dies


if we don’t suffer, we don’t need God,

this pain is like an inch away from being worse,

why God, must I ache,

can I not reach high any longer?

Do I pour my heart and say,

The things which on my mind,

Do not unwind and just decay,

Day by day.

Every moment passing,

A thought is caged into my heart’s

caverns, wherein blood boils,

not as freely as it should,

hot and bubbly, burning hell,

anger at its finest, why does it hide?

Can I not shout aloud and curse the world,

if this is art I’m free!

I’m free to curse anybody.

This is art I’m free. This is art I’m free.

Music is your enemy, give me a pen,

I will write a eulogy devoted to one of them,

the cowards who devoured my heart,

spat on my shoes and acted confused,

when little did they know, a gangster appeared,

fingers pointed at you he said,

what you gonna say now bitch?

the tides have turned on you.