KRIKOS – Monocle


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[NEW MUSIQ] #RiseoftheEasternSon FULL ALBUM (prod. KRIKOS)


#RiseoftheEasternSon the full album produced entirely by KRIKOS himself is now fully available for streaming. Check it out here:

The only guest featured on the album is his Colours of the Culture comrade NIKO IS. Curated by KRIKOS, Thanks Joey & Colours of the Culture.

While this album is made available for free-streaming, as an up and coming artist I take all support very seriously! To purchase this album, click the following BUY NOW link below or visit my STORE page on this blog.

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P.L.O. Style – [Political Undertones in Pop-Culture continued…]


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Hip-Hop is always vilified. Guns, crime, jewelry, flamboyance, extreme rhetoric, vulgarity.

Malcolm X once said that governments often oppress people and then chastise them when they express their discontent or attempt a revolution.

It is always easy to rationalize hate of the oppressed, especially for the privileged classes who don’t understand what it means to have nothing, to be hated, and to have their voice suppressed.

The culture of the caucasian community likes to apply harsh & strict values on society, meanwhile, their societal representatives are often caught in scandals in which they are indulging in hypocritical activities.

These ‘strict values’ emanate from a sort of, Disney-esque fairy tale conceptualization of reality, in which man is an innocent child being ‘corrupted’ by cultures like hip-hop. Now don’t get me wrong, I love the Lion King. My point is not to criticize Disney, but on the contrary, the misconstruing of such fairy-tale enterprises which often establish, engrain & enforce social constructs.

The irony is that the reality is quite the opposite.

Hip-Hop was born out of the corruption of social representatives, from politics to big business. Drawing influence from the ideologies of fanaticism, white supremacy & the Jim Crow culture became a form of institutionalized disenfranchisement which perpetuates almost permanently a state of destitute poverty.

Meanwhile the “white man”, the “Donald Sterlings” of America do whatever it takes behind closed doors to secure their fortunes, which are ironically usually made off the backs of non-whites.

The system of disenfranchisement and racism in America is closely linked to its view of the rest of the world. The late Edward Said, a prominent Palestinian intellectual, labeled this self-righteous dogma of the ‘white man’ as Orientalism, which he argued, revealed a long-standing tradition of Western Civilization’s oversimplification of Eastern (or non-Western) culture.  its tools of invasion and oppression abroad, from the Middle East, to Africa, to South America, to the Far East. This ideological bigotry formed much of the cultural foundations of the Occident, or the West, which was essentially used as a justification of the enslavement and exploitation of the Orient. It was responsible for the trans-atlantic slave trade, and the modern system of disenfranchisement of African-Americans in the US.

That is why perhaps the majority of the anti-supremacist collective uprisings which arose in the 19th and 20th centuries occurred in South America, Asia, the Middle East & Africa. And all the while the propaganda and military systems have been at work in the West. Fox News is our Joseph Goebbels, the Nazi’s propaganda artist.

In their collaborative album, Distant Relatives, legendary MC Nas & Reggae godson Damien Marley express these grievances thoroughly. The following is one of the tracks off the album, “Road to Zion”, with undertones that capture the the trials of modern man, the modern Black man, in a turbulent world.

Let it also be known that just like any genre of music or medium of art can be exploited for the sake of political interests, so too can hip-hop. Since the deaths of giants B.I.G. & Pac, hip-hop’s mainstream has been left largely devoid of even the most remote references to oppression & black consciousness. Among the leaders of movement in today’s America are Kanye West & Jay-Z, whose albums never fall short of addressing personal & social grievances.

As an Arab-American, I would like to express that the modern struggle for freedom is shared by most minorities. I once heard a prominent figure within the African-American community suggest, “the Muslim is the new (black man)”. With Islamophobia and anti-Arab sentiment at its peak, not to mention the deprivation of the Palestinians at its worst condition, it is more than necessary for me to underline the importance of the role played by the cultures of the Middle East in contributing to hip-hop & the initiative for genuine art & freedom. Thanks to OkayPlayer, I came across Here is a track by another legendary MC, none other than Method Man of the Wu, titled P.L.O. Style, which surfaced at a time when the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict reached heights of unprecedented contention.

The Church of Hip-Hop


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The political, religious & socio-economic conditions of the African-American communities birthed hip-hop, in the words of OG Q-Tip.

It was in response to Iggy Azalia’s rants about her role in pop-culture.

I don’t listen to her music. I listen to real hip-hop. Take that as you will. A lot of people might try to argue with me about the rights of all individuals to express themselves, and I agree. I also believe in the rights of individuals to choose what they consider to be dope, or wack.

In his album, Yeezus, I believe Kanye is doing something very specific. He is challenging the foundation of Western civilization which has been responsible for institutionalized oppression of African-Americans. More specifically, Kanye has adopted the philosophical grievances of ‘controversial’ german philosopher Frederich Nietzsche, by criticizing the religious dogma of the Judeo-Christian conception of reality, morality & behavior. The Ubermensch, or highest potential of the individual, is suppressed by pseudo-religious propaganda, which Nietzsche believed was responsible for the pollution of the concept of God. This process, he called the “death of God.”

In a recent article he published, rapper Ras Kass explains the meaning behind his song, “How To Kill God”, in which he elaborated on the association between religious dogma & oppression of African-Americans and other minorities.

There is a tendency for American media outlets to lose it when artists, philosophers or popular figures of any persuasion make critical comments about the Judeo-Christian concept of God. It is quickly associated with fanaticism. The irony?

Movies like Exodus do no justice is portraying history. The Jews were probably not white. The jews, who are subjects of persecution, probably were & still are black, eastern, oriental.

When artists like Kanye West make bold claims like “I Am a God”, I could care less whether he believes it or not, because Kanye West isn’t the one brutalizing Africans in America & slaughtering children in the Middle East. I believe Kanye West’s message is to shake up the foundations of America so as to expose the hypocrisies and double-standards of this country which work against movements for collective consciousness.

The message of hip-hop has always been a positive one. It is just that, true freedom is often misunderstood and false portrayed. Hip-Hop & its artists, the genuine ones, fight to wake up the modern man, who has been sedated by forces of collectivism, conformity & power.

Is there an anti-liberal bias on Western media outlets?


Is there an anti-liberal bias on Western media outlets? What you think?