Don’t Call Me A Sinner


This poem is dedicated to a persian poet by the name of Rumi. A poem I read from a new edition of a collection of his poetry called The Essential Rumi by Coleman Barks inspired this poem.

Everybody talks shit,

I’m a shit talker too,

When I see a fool do,

What I never would!

 

Better believe I’ll spew,

The scrutiny I should,

Will it be understood,

I’m no greater than you?

 

Must be funny when,

After a second or two,

You will come to find,

I’ve committed that crime,

 

But don’t call me a sinner,

You sin all the time!

Go waste your breath,

While I taste my wine.

White Feathers


Your veil makes you that much more,

Attractive to my inner yearnings,

Oh how I wish that I could be,

Underneath that cotton surface

covering your head, tracing along your hair,

Down your arched spine.

I see you in my dreams,

Lying on the softness of my bed sheets,

Your olive skin against them,

Drowning in a pool of white feathers;

They fall from my pillowcases,

Into the nakedness between your thighs.

Unplugged


Tonight has been a special night. I haven’t felt like this in years. Thank God I do. I haven’t felt this free in a while.

What happened was strange.

I kind of experienced a mental breakdown.

It started with these mental storms that I could not handle. I couldn’t stop thinking. I couldn’t.

I did not have control of my mind. It was as if my mind was a slave to itself. Whatever it wanted to do, it would, and I would let it.

But suddenly it hit me.

After hours of laying in bed and thinking and thinking and thinking, it clicked.

My mind was enslaved by the things I wanted. As a result, it could not be itself. It could not be what it was intended to be – a faculty for reasoning, knowledge, wisdom, beauty, meaning, and happiness.

But I was not giving my mind those things. Instead, I was feeding it meaninglessness.

It was like a trade off. If I wanted to continue desiring certain things, whatever they be, then I would have to sell my mind (soul) to meaninglessness.

Kind of reminds me of the movie the Matrix.

In the movie, humanity was enslaved to a system that satisfied their desires. That system is called the Matrix. Those who did not unplug themselves from the Matrix – or, the fake world – were slaves to their desires, whereas Neo, Trinity and Morpheus (and their gang) were not. They were free.

They became free when they discerned the meaningless of the physical world and all the pleasures that come with it. True existence, they realized, lies in the spiritual world, or the world of the forms, as the ancient Greek philosopher Plato calls it. The world of the forms is where we find things like compassion, love, patience and other virtues.

But that’s not to say that the physical world doesn’t matter. It does. What I am saying here is simply that the intangible world means much more. It has much more meaning.

Therefore, the spiritual world should always sit higher on our priority list than the material world. Otherwise we become shallow, and ultimately, meaningless. It’s sad really, to think that we human beings, distinct from other animals with our free will, can reduce ourselves to animals and become enslaved to instinct and impulse.

What I decided tonight is that I prefer to be unplugged. I prefer to be free and enlightened instead of ignorant and enslaved. I prefer chasing truth over money, meaning over material, virtue over vice.

Just remember, it’s okay to have fun and enjoy the physical world too. But never let your desires alter your perception of reality. If ever you feel like a choice you are about to make is going to negatively alter your perception of reality, it’s because it is.

Inner Turmoil


by Tim Essex

What will tomorrow’s weather bring,

What will the weather bring,

Tomorrow when…yes, tomorrow,

How am I to track every thing?

 

Thought I’d dance this night away,

While yesterday I yearned to sing,

Today my studies are still unfinished,

My anxiousness is lingering.

 

I’ve done what ought to be done,

What I lost before has been won,

But what of tomorrow; what will it bring?

Imagine if we have no sun.

Hypocrisy


I debated posting this poem for a very long time. The reason is because I felt it was very harsh. I felt it would give off the wrong message and that it would confuse people about what I believe. But after consulting a few of my friends who encouraged me to post it, I went ahead and did. This poem is dedicated to Omar Khayyam, a great Persian polymath, philosopher, and poet. Below is a painting of him sipping wine, something he wrote about and truly enjoyed doing.

Who appointed you as holy arbiter,
You foolish men who lie on oath,
Preaching of God and all His glory,
I pray He make you choke!

All your words and false messages,
They only but show your truest color,
Only God is great, Only God is perfect,
There is no room for any other.

Go to church and bow on your knees,
And pray that a better you is born,
By day you will have cured a disease,
By night you will have turned to porn.

I’ll drink my wine and alcohol,
I’ll dance and sing and laugh and crawl,
Drunk off my ass, but always sincere,
For I, like Adam, took the fall.

Hell


by Luca Signorelli

Hell is where we go, when we say no,

No to the question of: Is He above?

A friend gone foe, for feeling love,

Love is the enemy; love is woe.

 

This is negative energy; one Hell of a mind,

The fire that burns; one Hell of a time,

Hell is no single place you can find,

But a state of unseeing; being blind.

 

Surprise, surprise, there in the mirror,

You ought see the angel standing behind,

Wishing to get in, but your soul is too stubborn,

Look in the mirror, see your demise.

 

One Hell of an ego, one Hell of a mind,

The roasting furnace is a bunch of lies,

For the burning and hurting, these are just signs,

Of the life of which we are undeserving.

D.O.G.M.A.M.G.O.D.


It’s incredible how much we change in one single day.

Our moods change. Our opinions change. Our beliefs change. Our feelings change.

So much change.

For the longest time, I couldn’t understand why. Instead of accepting it, I tried to resist  it.

I thought something was wrong with me. I thought something was out of the loop. I thought I wasn’t ordinary.

But it turns out, it’s just part of being human.

At least that’s what I believe.

What isn’t ordinary however, is trying to resist these changes; trying to resist the natural flow of things.

The reason I say that is because I believe these changes to be part of a bigger picture.

Some people call that bigger picture Nature.

I call it God.

I Saw The Good Again


I was watching the interview with Bashar al-Assad by Barbara Walters when suddenly I noticed my mind was beginning to change.

In my thoughts, I was attacking almost everything he was saying, judging his every move, and questioning his intentions.

I knew something was wrong however, because I usually don’t feel this way about Mr. Assad, and I usually never analyze things in such a negative way.

Normally, I do my best to discern the truth without any bias in order to be as objective as possible.

My ultimate goal is to determine what is the most JUST perspective, and that is the one I follow. Nothing is greater than the good of justice.

As I watched the interview however,  I had a change of mind. I felt something happened to me internally, something spiritual. But it wasn’t good. It wasn’t a healthy feeling. It was as if my spirit was diluted with something, as if it were being suppressed by something.

I believe what was happening was my pride was getting the best of me. I was seeing through an egocentric perspective – that is, I was not thinking with a pure mind and listening with a pure heart. I was not looking for the good. I had forgotten the good.

At that very moment, I remembered something I once read by Plato. It was something like:

Ordinary men can’t help their forgetfulness. They can’t help the fact that they slip into states of impurity, evil, and ignorance. That is why they need leaders, intellectuals, philosophers. They need martyrs like Moses, Jesus, Muhammad, Ghandi, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, etc, etc, to remind them of the greater good which is so easily forgot; the greater good which is God.

And that’s when I turned back to the interview.

I pressed play, and listened closely.

Suddenly my heart changed.

Suddenly, I saw the good again.

Part II: Barbara Walters & Bashar al-Assad


As Part II of my segment on the Full Barbara Walters interview with Bashar Al-Assad, which was, to our intellectual misfortune, not aired on national television in its full length, I will provide the highlights of the interview, summarizing key points and, more specifically, those that have been largely overlooked by analysts, the media, and the international community.

When Barbara Walters asked Bashar al-Assad why he believed the United Nations was not a credible institution, he responded with the following:

“They never implemented any of the resolutions that are related to the Arab World, to the Palestinians, the Syrian land. If they talk about human rights, what about the Palestinians suffering in the occupied territory. What about my land and my people that left their land because it is occupied by Israel?”

Barbara Walters then asked Assad about Turkey and the Arab League’s more aggressive approach to Syria, more specifically, the recent sanctions they slapped against Syria.

“Turkey and the Arab League have a hidden agenda. They don’t care about the demonstrations, the Syrian people, democracy,” Bashar responded.

“We still have good relations with neighboring countries.”

“Does the Arab League want to destroy you?” Walters replied.

“You have to ask them. I don’t know their will to be frank.”

“Will you allow outside monitors to come into your country, and to allow them to go to cities like Homs?”

“Yes”

“Under what circumstances?”

“To be in line with our sovereignty.”

“What does that mean?”

“To do everything in cooperation with the Syrian government: how to move, how to prepare, how to protect them. We asked for monitors before they (the Arab League) did. They didn’t want to discuss with us. If they don’t want to discuss, then no.”

“Can outside foreign reporters come? They have not been allowed.”

“No – they were allowed, and you are here.”

“I am here and I have a correspondent here with me.”

“But you’ve been here for two days now. Did anybody tell you where to go and where not to go? Nobody. You are free to go wherever you want.”

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Author’s Note: This is the end of Part II. Part III will be coming shortly and will be comprised mainly of the segment of the interview during which Bashar speaks about his wife, his father, his brother, and his children.